1. shimish:

coyotesqrl:

tony-the-intelligent-goon:

ashiibaka:

Science.

I can’t tell what my favorite part is, but it’s either
scientists wasting budget and time to see if ants count their steps
the idea to put ants on stilts
there had to be a guy who made ant stilts and put them on the ants
confused ants

sigh
"…wasting budget and time…"
Muggles really don’t understand basic research, do they. Not actually a question, hence no question mark.
Science isn’t engineering. Science isn’t goal-oriented. Science isn’t about making a better potato chip or a more fuel-efficient car or a cure for cancer. It accomplishes those things incidental to its function. Science is about asking, “Why?” and “How?” Science is about curiosity and exploration.

And…don’t scientists have to be funded based on a proposal? Like.. “I would like to study how ants navigate and get around” and then someone was like “oh, that’s cool. Here’s money” ?
I mean…do people just have a budge called “science” ?

    shimish:

    coyotesqrl:

    tony-the-intelligent-goon:

    ashiibaka:

    Science.

    I can’t tell what my favorite part is, but it’s either

    • scientists wasting budget and time to see if ants count their steps
    • the idea to put ants on stilts
    • there had to be a guy who made ant stilts and put them on the ants
    • confused ants

    sigh

    "…wasting budget and time…"

    Muggles really don’t understand basic research, do they. Not actually a question, hence no question mark.

    Science isn’t engineering. Science isn’t goal-oriented. Science isn’t about making a better potato chip or a more fuel-efficient car or a cure for cancer. It accomplishes those things incidental to its function. Science is about asking, “Why?” and “How?” Science is about curiosity and exploration.

    And…don’t scientists have to be funded based on a proposal? Like.. “I would like to study how ants navigate and get around” and then someone was like “oh, that’s cool. Here’s money” ?

    I mean…do people just have a budge called “science” ?

    (Source: memewhore)

  2. blackfishh:

maddieecious:

Orkid mimics a child during the Shamu show, Believe, at Sea World in San Diego, California. 
Fact: Orkid is rumored to be the most intelligent orca in captivity. 

 ORKID <33333

    blackfishh:

    maddieecious:

    Orkid mimics a child during the Shamu show, Believe, at Sea World in San Diego, California. 

    Fact: Orkid is rumored to be the most intelligent orca in captivity. 

     ORKID <33333

    (via kyrrahaf)

  3. Aug. 27 1:35 pm

    justice4mikebrown:

    (via mysticalwitchbitch)

  4. thepeoplesrecord:

9-year-old boy was executed in Chicago: Where is the outrage?August 25, 2014
Antonio Smith, 9 years old, was assassinated the other day.
He was Chicago’s youngest fatal shooting victim this year. He was shot at least four times and fell in a backyard on the South Side.
And when I went out there on 71st and Woodlawn less than 24 hours after he was murdered, here’s what I didn’t see:
I didn’t see protesters waving their hands in the air for network TV cameras. I didn’t see the Revs. Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson playing their usual roles in the political race card game.
I didn’t see white college anarchists hiding behind their white plastic Guy Fawkes masks talking about being oppressed by the state. I didn’t see politicians equivocating. But the worst thing I didn’t see was this:
I didn’t see the theatrical outrage that you see in Ferguson, Mo. A white cop in Ferguson — a place most people never heard of just two weeks ago — shoots a black teenager and the nation knows what to do. The actors scream out their roles on cue.
But in Chicago, a black child is assassinated, and Attorney General Eric Holder isn’t on his way here. There are no hashtag campaigns saying #saveourboys. And instead of loud anger, there is numb silence.
"It’s only the second day. I don’t know what will happen," said Helen Cross, 82, a neighbor who lives down the street from the shooting. She’s lived in the neighborhood for 49 years.
"Everybody says it’s a shame," she said. "It was terrible. But nobody’s … nobody is …"
Her voice trailed off.
Angry?
She nodded.
"A lot of people don’t want to be involved until it happens to their family," said her son, Lewis Cross. "And that’s the shame."
The screamers and the race hustlers buzzing in Ferguson like flies have it easy: White cop/black victim is a script that sells, and the TV cameras come running.
But in Chicago, young African-American and Latino men and boys and girls are shot down far too regularly, by neighbors, meaning other black and Latinos.
Venting outrage at police is easier, and it’s politically advantageous. Venting at neighbors is a bit more complicated and dangerous. The neighbors will still be there on the block long after the columnists and the TV cameras leave. People are afraid. They don’t want their children to pay for anything they might say.
"This city is crazy," said neighbor Arnold Caffey, a mechanic from Detroit. "I mean, Detroit is better than this."
We were sitting on his porch out of the rain.
"A baby has been assassinated, and where’s the anger?" he asked. "When that child was shot, some people out there were still drinking, I’m saying a baby has been assassinated, they’re like, well, they don’t care."
What if the shooter had been police officer — a white police officer?
"You know what would happen, the whole Ferguson thing," Caffey said. "But it’s not."
The Rev. Michael Pfleger, pastor at St. Sabina Roman Catholic Church, has consistently condemned the violence in Chicago. He doesn’t flit in or out of town. He’s always here and was scheduled to lead a neighborhood prayer vigil Thursday evening.
"This 9-year-old boy — in my mind — when you get multiple shots for a 9-year-old boy in a back alley, that’s an execution," he said in a telephone interview before the event. "That’s not a drive-by, that’s not an accident. That sounds like an execution."
He’s been outspoken about Ferguson, but he knows that moral outrage is undercut if there’s silence over the assassination of a child.
"We cannot simply be outraged about something that happens someplace else and get immune to what happens at home," he said. "This is pure evil.
"We have to be absolutely outraged. And we have to say, ‘We’re going to find out who you are, and we’re going to turn you in because you’re not going to get by with this. You can’t kill a 9-year-old kid and go home and eat McDonald’s and watch TV.’"
Antonio Smith was shot in a backyard that borders a railroad viaduct on 71st Street. To the east, the gang that runs things is called Sircon City. To the west, a group called Pocket Town runs the show. Police say he was not a gang member.
Cynthia Smith-Thigpen, a retired Chicago Public Schools teacher, talked about the lack of public outrage.
"There’s shamelessness to the silence over this boy’s death," she said. "It’s like, ‘Oh, another child dead in Chicago.’ Perhaps we’re all numb to what goes on in this city."

In the alley, on hot, rainy afternoon, three men sweated through their suits. They weren’t politicians or cable TV screamers. They were detectives working a heater case.

Out there was a concrete pad where a garage once stood, and thick grass in the yard and bushes around the edges. And there was the rain and the silence in Pocket Town.
I stood off to the side and pictured Antonio in my mind. Was he running? Were his hands raised the way activists said Michael Brown’s hands were raised in Ferguson?
Antonio was a baby. He didn’t allegedly steal cigars or threaten a shopkeeper or punch a cop. He was 9 years old. He was targeted. He was murdered.
"People need to be angry, but this isn’t TV, and some people really don’t care," said neighbor Tony Miller, who has a son about Antonio’s age. "And people who don’t live here don’t want to know, but people get killed all the time."
Source
Antonio’s funeral is scheduled for this Saturday morning. If anyone has any information about any rallies, organizing meetings or any support funds for his family, please feel free to message us. 

    thepeoplesrecord:

    9-year-old boy was executed in Chicago: Where is the outrage?
    August 25, 2014

    Antonio Smith, 9 years old, was assassinated the other day.

    He was Chicago’s youngest fatal shooting victim this year. He was shot at least four times and fell in a backyard on the South Side.

    And when I went out there on 71st and Woodlawn less than 24 hours after he was murdered, here’s what I didn’t see:

    I didn’t see protesters waving their hands in the air for network TV cameras. I didn’t see the Revs. Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson playing their usual roles in the political race card game.

    I didn’t see white college anarchists hiding behind their white plastic Guy Fawkes masks talking about being oppressed by the state. I didn’t see politicians equivocating. But the worst thing I didn’t see was this:

    I didn’t see the theatrical outrage that you see in Ferguson, Mo. A white cop in Ferguson — a place most people never heard of just two weeks ago — shoots a black teenager and the nation knows what to do. The actors scream out their roles on cue.

    But in Chicago, a black child is assassinated, and Attorney General Eric Holder isn’t on his way here. There are no hashtag campaigns saying #saveourboys. And instead of loud anger, there is numb silence.

    "It’s only the second day. I don’t know what will happen," said Helen Cross, 82, a neighbor who lives down the street from the shooting. She’s lived in the neighborhood for 49 years.

    "Everybody says it’s a shame," she said. "It was terrible. But nobody’s … nobody is …"

    Her voice trailed off.

    Angry?

    She nodded.

    "A lot of people don’t want to be involved until it happens to their family," said her son, Lewis Cross. "And that’s the shame."

    The screamers and the race hustlers buzzing in Ferguson like flies have it easy: White cop/black victim is a script that sells, and the TV cameras come running.

    But in Chicago, young African-American and Latino men and boys and girls are shot down far too regularly, by neighbors, meaning other black and Latinos.

    Venting outrage at police is easier, and it’s politically advantageous. Venting at neighbors is a bit more complicated and dangerous. The neighbors will still be there on the block long after the columnists and the TV cameras leave. People are afraid. They don’t want their children to pay for anything they might say.

    "This city is crazy," said neighbor Arnold Caffey, a mechanic from Detroit. "I mean, Detroit is better than this."

    We were sitting on his porch out of the rain.

    "A baby has been assassinated, and where’s the anger?" he asked. "When that child was shot, some people out there were still drinking, I’m saying a baby has been assassinated, they’re like, well, they don’t care."

    What if the shooter had been police officer — a white police officer?

    "You know what would happen, the whole Ferguson thing," Caffey said. "But it’s not."

    The Rev. Michael Pfleger, pastor at St. Sabina Roman Catholic Church, has consistently condemned the violence in Chicago. He doesn’t flit in or out of town. He’s always here and was scheduled to lead a neighborhood prayer vigil Thursday evening.

    "This 9-year-old boy — in my mind — when you get multiple shots for a 9-year-old boy in a back alley, that’s an execution," he said in a telephone interview before the event. "That’s not a drive-by, that’s not an accident. That sounds like an execution."

    He’s been outspoken about Ferguson, but he knows that moral outrage is undercut if there’s silence over the assassination of a child.

    "We cannot simply be outraged about something that happens someplace else and get immune to what happens at home," he said. "This is pure evil.

    "We have to be absolutely outraged. And we have to say, ‘We’re going to find out who you are, and we’re going to turn you in because you’re not going to get by with this. You can’t kill a 9-year-old kid and go home and eat McDonald’s and watch TV.’"

    Antonio Smith was shot in a backyard that borders a railroad viaduct on 71st Street. To the east, the gang that runs things is called Sircon City. To the west, a group called Pocket Town runs the show. Police say he was not a gang member.

    Cynthia Smith-Thigpen, a retired Chicago Public Schools teacher, talked about the lack of public outrage.

    "There’s shamelessness to the silence over this boy’s death," she said. "It’s like, ‘Oh, another child dead in Chicago.’ Perhaps we’re all numb to what goes on in this city."

    Out there was a concrete pad where a garage once stood, and thick grass in the yard and bushes around the edges. And there was the rain and the silence in Pocket Town.

    I stood off to the side and pictured Antonio in my mind. Was he running? Were his hands raised the way activists said Michael Brown’s hands were raised in Ferguson?

    Antonio was a baby. He didn’t allegedly steal cigars or threaten a shopkeeper or punch a cop. He was 9 years old. He was targeted. He was murdered.

    "People need to be angry, but this isn’t TV, and some people really don’t care," said neighbor Tony Miller, who has a son about Antonio’s age. "And people who don’t live here don’t want to know, but people get killed all the time."

    Source

    Antonio’s funeral is scheduled for this Saturday morning. If anyone has any information about any rallies, organizing meetings or any support funds for his family, please feel free to message us. 

    (via mysticalwitchbitch)

  5. diligenda:

    White people who support Darren Wilson

    (Source: wenchyfloozymoo, via mysticalwitchbitch)

  6. nicklugo:

    Spanish is a beautiful language. You don’t say “I love you” in Spanish, you say “yo quiero comer culo” which translates to “you are the light of my life” which I think is one of the most beautiful things to say to someone

    (via kidshit)

  7. BIG ASS NEWS !!!!!!!!!»

    dasvidanias:

    Anyone who has been following my tumblr for a while now will be aware of my ongoing mental health issues. Diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia,which included an eating disorder,depression,anxiety,hallucinations etc i was prescribed a drug named clozapine/clozaril. I’ve been on this drug for three…

  8. destispell:

    men: rape jokes hahaha! beating women haha! lol make me a sandwich whore! put on makeup fugly! hahaha!

    women: those aren’t funny.

    men: lighten up, it’s a joke wow must be on her period women are so emotional lol

    women: i drink the tears of men, haha!

    men: hOW DARE YOU. HOW DARE YOU PROMOTE THE SUFFERING OF US MEN? DO YOU KNOW WHAT WE HAVE DONE FOR YOU? YOU WOULD BE NOTHING WITHOUT US. THATS NOT FUNNY AT ALL

    (via arbitrary-words)

  9. (Source: pavel-petel, via kidshit)

  10. http://y02mustang.tumblr.com/post/95952363524/dainesanddaffodils-cyprith-moniquill»

    dainesanddaffodils:

    cyprith:

    moniquill:

    danimalx:

    liztrade:

    stoneandbloodandwater:

    iincantatem:

    Dumbledore, notorious for giving second chances Dumbledore, let Sirius rot in Azkaban for twelve years.

    He must have known Sirius well due to his time…

  11. wholelottans:

    bedsider:

    Birth control gives you the freedom to plan a family on your own terms. It allows you to work or travel or pursue your dreams before you’re ready to have a baby. It helps with certain medical conditions. It’s there when you want to have smokin’ hot sex and not get pregnant. Basically, there are lots of reasons to be thankful for birth control.

    Girls star and all-around awesome lady Lena Dunham took to Twitter to voice her appreciation. She also asked women and men what birth control does for them. The whole thing made our ♥ sing.

    Been wondering lately what would irritate the anti-contraception league more. The fact that I take birth control to stymie an over active ovary, or the fact that all these eggs are dropping into a void as I have no uterus.

    Of course all that doesn’t really matter as I’m a widow and should probably just retire myself to a nunnery.

    (via ladyofrage)

  12. rosehip-baby:

    I’ve watched this at least 200 times

    (Source: koolghoul, via captaingrumpycub)

  13. witchsistah:

    adoreneedles:

    pixiepienix:

    vixyish:

    solarbird:

    xgenepositive:

    mmmahogany:

    #john barrowman is having none of your misogynist bullshit

    i love that barrowman’s response also distances him from the contestant
    "hahahaha women do laundry right john?  you with me, john?"
    "don’t lump me in with you, you fucking martian”

    This is what I’m talking about when I keep saying that men have to deny the endorsement. This guy wanted Barrowman’s tacit support or agreement for his sexism, as part of bonding through humour. John went nope.

    Bolding mine.

    this is what I need from the men in my life

    you want us to believe you don’t hate us? I need to hear this come out of your mouths when we are in a group situation and one of the guys thinks he’s being funny

    when you shuffle awkwardly and tell me AFTERWARDS that so-and-so was being a dick that has precisely ZERO value to me okay?

    Seriously, this is such a huge problem. Men want to seem cool to other men so when you call men on their shit you’re actively saying “that ain’t cool” and it makes them see dumb and then they don’t do it as much. I don’t care too much for guys who are only feminists when around women.

    Bold italics mine cuz TRUTH!

    I don’t do private apologies after someone has tried to humiliate me in public. If you’re gonna act out in public then don’t be a fuckin’ coward and try to make amends in private so that YOU won’t be embarrassed.

    (Source: kaniehtiio, via ladyofrage)

  14. samanticshift:

    chasewoods:

    The Events in Ferguson will one day make a great movie for white people to feel guilty about and give an academy award to

    and the story will revolve around a white journalist who ultimately realizes that wow, we’re all human

    (via mysticalwitchbitch)

  15. a conversation that actually fucking happened

    prestigious-lover:

    qvesadilla:

    boy: haha, you’re really cute for a black girl ;)
    me: thanks! you’re alright for a white boy ;D
    boy: … that’s kind of a weird thing to say, but okay lol

    me:image

    That was literally my face before even seeing the gif.

    (via ladyofrage)

About

I'm radical. At least I think I am, and that's all that matters. Right? Right.

I spend less time pretending to be normal and more time letting the crazy run rampant.

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